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Abee, Steven
English Teacher, Visual Arts Academy. Room V321.
Ahn, Ms.
English Teacher, Music Academy. Room M201.
Banuelos, Brenda
EL Teacher, Visual Arts Academy. Room T209.
Cairns-Berteau, Ms.
English Teacher, Theater Academy. room T206.
Cunningham, Aimee
English Teacher, Dance Academy. Room D406.
Gozonsky, Mr. M.
English Teacher, Visual Arts Academy. Room T219.
Harris, Lesley
English Teacher, Dance Academy. Room D407.
Morse, Jeffrey
English Teacher, Music Academy. Room M206.
Mui, Ms.
English Teacher, Visual Arts Academy. Room V303.
Odegaard, M.
English Teacher, Theater Arts Academy. Room T218.
Williams, Angela
English Teacher, Dance Academy. Room D410.
English Language Arts

Please note that we are performing a major reconstruction of the web site and some content is incomplete or not currently available.

Courses

Graduation requirement: 4 years

A-G requirement: 4 years


English as a Second Language (ESL)

  • Intro. ESL
  • ESL 1A
  • ESL 1B
  • ESL 2A
  • ESL 2B
  • ESL 3
  • ESL 4

9th Grade Courses:

  • English Language Skills 3
  • English 9 A/B
  • Honors English 9 A/B

 

English 9AB Course Description

The major purpose of this course is to analyze literature and expository text in greater depth and produce complex writing assignments. Students will continue to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades with more refinement, depth, and sophistication with grade-appropriate material. The California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the ninth grade are expected to read one and one-half million words annually on their own, including a good representation of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online articles. Students will apply and refine their command of the writing process and writing conventions to produce narrative, persuasive, expository and descriptive texts of at least 1,500 words each.

English 9AB is organized into three standards-based instructional components that focus on persuasion, exposition, and literary analysis, integrating skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. During the persuasion instructional component, students will read persuasive texts, with a focus on the credibility of an author’s argument, the relationship between generalizations and evidence, the comprehensiveness of evidence, the way in which the author’s intent affects the structure and tone of the text, and extend ideas through original analysis, evaluation, and elaboration. Students will also write persuasive essays and deliver persuasive presentations. In the exposition component, students will read expository texts, with a focus on synthesizing and extending ideas presented in primary and secondary sources, including works by a singly author dealing with a single issue. In addition, students will write expository essays and deliver expository presentations. During the literary analysis component, students will read literary texts, with a focus on analyzing central themes in multiple works as well as analyzing themes in relation to issues of an historical period. Students will write responses to literature and deliver oral responses to literature. English 9AB meets the basic ninth-grade English requirement for graduation and fulfills the B requirement of the UC/CSU Subject Area Requirements.

 


10th grade Courses:

  • English Language Skills 4
  • English 10
  • Honors English 10 A/B

 

English 10AB   Course Description

The major purpose of this course is to emphasize analyzing literature in greater depth, analyzing expository text, and producing more complex writing assignments. Students will continue to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades with more refinement, depth and sophistication with grade-appropriate material. The California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the tenth grade are expected to read one and one-half million words annually on their own, including a good representation of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online articles. Students will apply and refine their command of the writing process and writing conventions to produce narrative, persuasive, expository and descriptive texts of at least 1,500 words each.

English 10AB is organized into three standards-based instructional components that focus on persuasion, exposition, and literary analysis, integrating skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. During the persuasion instructional component, students will read persuasive tests, with a focus on the credibility of an author’s argument, the relationship between generalizations and evidence, the comprehensiveness of evidence, the way in which the author’s intent affects the structure and tone of the text, and extend ideas through original analysis, evaluation, and elaboration. Students will generate relevant questions about readings on issues and engage in research. Students will also write persuasive essays and deliver persuasive presentations. In the exposition instructional component, students will read expository texts and use what they have learned to establish a controlling impression or coherent thesis that conveys a clear and distinctive perspective on a subject and maintain a consistent tone and focus throughout a piece of writing. They will use primary and secondary sources accurately, distinguish between information and the significance of the data, be aware of audience, anticipate misunderstandings, and use subject-specific terms accurately. During the literary analysis component, students will read literary texts (e.g., short stories, poetry, and longer works, including novels), recognize and understand the significance of various literary devices, including figurative language, imagery, allegory, and symbolism, and explain their appeal. Students will also explain how voice, persona, and the choice of a narrator affect characterization and the tone, plot, and credibility of a text. Students will write responses to literature and deliver oral responses to literature. English 10AB meets the basic tenth-grade English requirement for graduation and fulfills the B requirement of the UC/CSU Subject Area Requirements. 

 


11th grade Courses:

  • American Literature (first semester)
  • Honors American Literature
  • Contemporary Composition (second semester)
  • Honors Contemporary Composition
  • AP English Language

 

American Literature and Composition (First Semester) Course Description

American Literature and Composition is a semester-long reading and writing course that includes standards-based instruction centered on recurrent themes and genres in United States literature from the colonial period to the present and reflects on the diversity of American life. Students read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of literature that reflect and enhance their studies of history and social science. The philosophical approach is the focus for the eleventh grade, as students analyze the philosophical arguments presented in literary works to determine whether the author’s positions have contributed to the quality of each work and the credibility of characters. As a means of developing the critical thinking and communication skills necessary for the demands of college and work, students will engage in discussion to prepare oral and written arguments that provide all relevant perspectives and consider the validity and reliability of sources. The California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the eleventh grade are expected to read two million words annually on their own, including a good representation of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online articles.

In this course, there is a concentrated focus on writing. American Literature and Composition includes a new composition   introduced in eleventh grade, the historical investigation report, which requires students to use primary and secondary sources to compare different points of view regarding a single historical event and explain reasons for the similarities and differences. Students are expected to write and revise a minimum of six academic compositions within the eleventh-grade year. Students will apply and refine their command of the writing process and writing conventions to produce narrative, persuasive, expository, and descriptive texts of at least 1,500 words each. This course meets one semester of the basic eleventh-grade English requirement for graduation and satisfies a B

Requirement of the UC/CSU Subject Area Requirements.

 

Contemporary Composition (Second Semester) Course Description

The major purpose of this standards-aligned semester course is to explore ideas, issues, and themes from contemporary fiction, nonfiction, and informational materials and to focus on writing coherent and complex texts that convey well-defined perspectives and tightly reasoned arguments. A Williams-approved textbook 11thGrade Contemporary Composition Course, is a primary text incorporation these genres of writing. Students will read, write, speak, and think about the structure, style, content, and purpose of contemporary literature, expository, and visual texts through different lenses and various perspectives to investigate personal, American, and global views on current events, issues, and themes. As a means of developing the critical thinking and communication skills necessary for the demands of college and work, students will engage in discussion to prepare oral and written arguments that provide all relevant perspectives and consider the validity and reliability of sources. The California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the eleventh grade are expected to read two million words annually on their own, including a good representation of high interest, rigorous, and relevant contemporary texts including magazines, newspapers, and online articles.

In this course, there is a concentrated focus on writing, specifically the genres of writing on college placement tests in English. Two new compositions are introduced in the eleventh grade: reflective composition and historical investigation. Reflective compositions require the student to explore the significance of a personal experience, event, or concern, while maintaining an appropriate balance between describing the incident and relating it to a more abstract idea. The historical investigation report requires students to use primary and secondary sources to compare different points of view regarding a single historical event and explain reasons for the similarities and differences. Students are expected to write and revise a minimum of six academic compositions within the eleventh-grade year. This course provides students opportunities to increase awareness of the audience, purpose, and progression of the stages of the writing process and writing conventions to produce narrative, persuasive, expository, and descriptive texts of at least 1,500 words each, including timed writing. This course fulfills a B requirement of the UC/CSU Subject Area Requirements.   

 

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition AB Course Description

Courses labeled Advanced Placement (AP) on student transcripts must receive authorization from the College Board. All AP English teachers have received authorization from the College Board to use the AP designation. A ledger of schools with their authorized courses will be made available to colleges and universities by November of each year.

Please refer to the AP Teacher’s website for their syllabus.  

 


12th grade Courses:

  • Expository Composition (first semester)
  • Honors Expository Composition
  • World Literature (second semester)
  • Honors World Literature
  • AP English Literature

 

Expository Composition (First Semester) Course Description

The major purpose of this semester course is to provide experiences in writing that are characterized by logical and coherent organization, clarity of expression, and suitability of style, usage, and the conventions of writing. The student is required to read closely within and across expository and informational genres (e.g., essays, biographies, critiques, précis, and newspaper and magazine articles) for literal and implied meaning and to demonstrate through classroom discussion, oral presentation, and written expression an understanding of text(s). Emphasis in this course is on expository reading and writing and the essential skills of editing, although the course provides some practice in other domains of writing.

The curriculum of this semester course was developed by a collaborative group of California State University and high school faculty to help students meet the expectations of college and university faculty, meet the California English—Language Arts Content Standards, and develop literacy skills critical to lifelong participation to the words of work and community. Students will read one full-length work, engage major research, and participate in multiple readings and discussions of varied genres through a recursive sequence of integrated reading and writing assignments. The interactive reading and writing assignments, many of which include informal writing throughout the process, move from pre-reading activities, through reading and post-reading activities, to formal writing assignments. Students learn to make predictions about texts, analyze both the content and rhetorical structures, and properly use materials from the texts they read in supporting their own oral and written arguments. The modules in the sequence of lessons in Expository Composition provide a recursive approach to the teaching of reading and writing that aims to support students’ developing abilities to negotiate a variety of complex texts of different genres that students will encounter in college and the diverse communities where they live and work.

Students are expected to write and revise a minimum of eight academic compositions within the twelfth-grade year, including timed writing pieces and developed compositions. The California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the twelfth grade are expected to read two million words annually on their own, including a good representation of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online articles. Students will apply and refine their command of the writing process, writing conventions, and rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description to produce texts of at least 1,500 words each. Expository Composition fulfills a B requirement of the UC/CSU Subject Area Requirements.

 

Modern Literature (Second Semester) Course Description

The major purpose of this standards-aligned semester elective course is to study significant works of the 20thcentury literary movement. The selected works are organized by genre, including mass media, or themes that deepen students’ knowledge and understanding of the universal human condition. Students will develop a basis for understanding modern literature through investigations of universal themes across social and historical contexts and evaluations of how the influences of the regions and historical events shaped the discourse across genres. As a means of developing the critical thinking and communication skills necessary for the demands of college and work, students will engage in discussion to prepare oral and written arguments that provide all relevant perspectives and consider the validity and reliability of sources.  Students will engage in a study of interpretative theories to help them understand multiple perspectives and ways to understand literature through different lenses.

In this course, there is an emphasis on writing. Modern Literature includes the historical investigation report, which requires students to use primary and secondary sources to compare different points of view regarding a single historical event and explain reasons for the similarities and differences. Students are expected to write and revise a minimum of eight academic compositions, including timed writing pieces, within the twelfth=grade year. This course provides students opportunities to increase awareness of the audience, purpose, and progression of the stages of the writing process and writing conventions to produce narrative, persuasive, expository, and descriptive texts of at least 1,500 words each. California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the twelfth grade are expected to read two million words annually on their own, including a good representation of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online articles. Modern Literature fulfills a B requirement of the UC/CSU Subject Area Requirements and is one of the possible courses paired with Expository Composition or Advanced Composition. 

 

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition AB Course Description

Courses labeled Advanced Placement (AP) on student transcripts must receive authorization from the College Board. All AP English teachers have received authorization from the College Board to use the AP designation. A ledger of schools with their authorized courses will be made available to colleges and universities by November of each year.

Please refer to the AP Teacher’s website for their syllabus.